Disabling/Removing OS X Native Apps

cgolebio
New Contributor III

Hey everyone,
I am not sure if this is a regurgitated topic, but I wanted to ask if there is any best practice, suggestions and/or ramifications for removing apps that are native to OS X, like FaceTime, Messages, Mail. We have Lync and Microsoft Outlook that we want to direct users more to.

I've seen by searching in Google that changing the permissions or running rm -rf /Applications/[nameofapp].app are possible solutions to this.

Appreciate the feedback.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

thoule
Valued Contributor II

Under OS X 10.11, those apps are protected by Apple (shakes fist at Apple). Drives me nuts how they won't let me manage my own environment! I took my base image, created with AutoDMG, converted it to RW, then deleted those apps, then converted the image back. However, applying the 10.11.4 update to my 10.11.3 brought back parts of those apps so they exist again, but won't run.

So deleting them is possible only by disabling SIP. If you don't have full control over your environment, then you might be best with 'Restricted Software' within Casper and a notice telling them what you want them to run.

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dgreening
Valued Contributor II

You could just restrict their run with a Restricted Software policy.

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6 REPLIES 6

thoule
Valued Contributor II

Under OS X 10.11, those apps are protected by Apple (shakes fist at Apple). Drives me nuts how they won't let me manage my own environment! I took my base image, created with AutoDMG, converted it to RW, then deleted those apps, then converted the image back. However, applying the 10.11.4 update to my 10.11.3 brought back parts of those apps so they exist again, but won't run.

So deleting them is possible only by disabling SIP. If you don't have full control over your environment, then you might be best with 'Restricted Software' within Casper and a notice telling them what you want them to run.

View solution in original post

duffcalifornia
Contributor

Could it just be as simple as putting the desired App icons in your dock, adding them to the JSS, then imaging your Macs with only those Apps in the dock? Yes, FaceTime and Mail would be on the machine, but they'd be buried within the Application folder, meaning that Joe Average User probably won't look past the dock for programs like that.

dgreening
Valued Contributor II

You could just restrict their run with a Restricted Software policy.

View solution in original post

rusty_adams
New Contributor II

I second @dgreening .

I just did this for FaceTime, Photobooth, and Messages to try to keep some students on task and out of trouble. Works like a charm, but beware the app name is case sensitive or the policy won't catch it.

If a user tries to click on it, it might flash for a second, but nothing happens.

cgolebio
New Contributor III

I do like using restricted software; I think what I am looking for is a way to remove the tease of it being there. But if that is not safely achievable, then simply restricting will work.

jasonm
New Contributor

"case sensitive"... slaps face.

I have been staring at trying to figure out why it would not remove "Facetime" and it should have been "FaceTime".

Thanks!