Composer Asking for Admin At Launch

Jae
New Contributor III

Is there a way around this? What does it happen when I launch composer?

5 REPLIES 5

mm2270
Legendary Contributor II

Are you asking if there's a way to not have it ask for your password? If so, no. It needs that because if it doesn't open Composer with admin/root privileges, it wouldn't be able to do many of the things its designed to do, like scan normally protected locations on the drive when doing snapshots, building packages, etc. Composer is intended to be used by Mac admins, not standard users, for building packages, so its not unusual it would ask for an admin password.

Jae
New Contributor III

That is what I figured. Is there a way to allow a standard user to access it temporarily?

mm2270
Legendary Contributor II

I can't imagine exactly how to do that. It would mean making them admins, or making some very specific changes to the sudoers file perhaps, but I'm not even sure what specific changes would be needed, or how it would affect Composer. Again, its designed to be used by full admins who have control over their Macs, and can do things like install new software.
I'm curious why you need non admins to be able to use Composer?

Wakko
Contributor

The only way to launch without it asking to escalate would be to launch it as root via terminal.
So once your root you can do something like this:

/Applications/Utilities/Casper Suite/Composer.app/Contents/MacOS/Composer

Composer will launch without having to escalate it anymore.

You can also use this trick to launch Casper Admin this way as well. Why would you want to do something like this well very simple. If you select a lot of packages that need indexing, the software will prompting you escalate for a few packages (sometimes). I've left machines running overnight, to come in the next morning and it's stopped indexing. Due to the fact that it needed to be escalated. So this way solves for that issue.

Look
Valued Contributor III

You could try calling it from a script run as a Self Service policy.
Pretty curious as to what they would be using it for, I would of thought anyone trusted enough to be wrapping up packages for you would be trusted enough to admin there own machine.