What does your Server (Everything) Infrastructure Look Like?

Hugonaut
Valued Contributor II

Currently, we are an ALL mac shop. By ALL mac shop, I mean, all of our end users & servers are mac. Server side we have all Mac Pro Trashcans & Mac Minis acting as servers (we even still have 1 xServe up!)

BUT...if anyone has seen the Server App on Mojave...it is very sad... (support.apple.com macOS Mojave Server Article Here)

With the alternatives provided in the article, we don't see the macOS server as a viable option as a server, thoughts on this?

Point being, what does your server environment look like as far os Hardware / oS / Software.

if you are in the same boat as us, what changes are you making? We are looking into going all RHEL.

100+ End Users in House & 1,000+ remote

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10 REPLIES 10

mark_mahabir
Valued Contributor

We are predominately a Windows shop (tens of thousands of machines vs ~275 managed Macs), so our Jamf Pro infrastructure lives on Windows Server 2012 R2 VMs. A NetSUS instance also lives on our VMware infrastructure.

For repackaging we have 3 x Mac Minis and another Mac Mini dedicated to Jamf Remote type tasks.

We don't do much/anything with macOS Server.

VT-Vincent
New Contributor III

We used to be an all Mac shop as well, but we started to migrate away from Apple on the server side after the Xserve was discontinued, that was the writing on the wall. We moved to Windows for most core network services, file servers, and replaced OD with AD. We also have 5 VMware hosts with about 40 virtualized application servers, a mix of both Windows and CentOS depending on what the application is. Everything is on Dell PowerEdge servers.

The only thing we keep our few Mac mini servers around for is running Caching Server. One for each of our buildings.

sdagley
Honored Contributor III

@Hugonaut My servers are mainly RHEL VMs running under VMware ESXi/vSphere. I'm not sure what the underlying hardware is, but with your trashcan MacPros you can install ESXi on them and legally host Mac VMs.

crbeck
Contributor

My school district is mostly Mac, over 2,000 Macs and 4,000 actively used iPads.

I started here a couple years ago with a single Windows Server 2008 R2 running both MySQL and the master Tomcat server, one virtual Windows Server 2012 running a "Management" login only Tomcat server, and one Xserve doing both Netboot and file distro over AFP.

I've since moved the MySQL server to a new physical box running RHEL 7.

I've moved file distro duties over to two Supermicro servers with Intel Atom chips, running CentOS 7, samba for smb file management through Jamf Admin, and nginx to serve the files over HTTPS.

I've added two Mac software update servers (reposado and margarita) running on CentOS 7 and nginx for serving updates over HTTPS, previously didn't have update servers, updates were just completely blocked.

Netboot is the same though I won't have need for that for long as we just purchased a bunch of new staff devices and I've been rolling them out on 10.13.6 with DEP enrollment process.

I haven't changed the Tomcat servers yet either, I'm hoping to get new hardware at some point for the master Tomcat server and convert to RHEL 7 at the same time.

Hugonaut
Valued Contributor II

Looks like we will have plenty of caching servers laying around! Virtualizing seems to be the name of the game. @sdagley Making our Trash Cans RHEL VMs is a great idea. @crbeck We just did the transition from SQL running mac side to our first RHEL Box. Very Happy. Tomcat on RHEL is something we are going to move to as well.

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jmahlman
Valued Contributor

We run our jamf server, SUS (reposado), and Netboot (BSDpy) all on RHEL 7 (both virtual and physical). We have an on-prem windows AD. We're probably going to setup a few Mac servers again for content caching eventually, but for now we don't utilize it much.

blackholemac
Valued Contributor III

Our district has always been predominantly Windows VMs on the backend with one Mac Pro cylinder and two Mac minis for support servers. With the demise of both the Xserve and now macOS Server as a product, there really isn't any reason for me to have more than three or four Mac minis dedicated as caching servers. Our Jamf Pro instance itself is hosted on a cluster of 5 Windows 2016 VMs and right now the distribution points are on our SMB storage arrays.

koalatee
Contributor II

Only around 700 macs here, but 3 servers:
Windows Server 2016 jamf
Windows Server 2016 mySQL
Ubuntu https DP

Hugonaut
Valued Contributor II

Thank you everyone for sharing, looks like a lot of infrastructure changes ahead! Appreciate it big time

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afarnsworth
Contributor

Three clustered JSS nodes in AWS behind an ELB. Amazon RDS Aurora MySQL instance w/ an ElastiCache memcached instance running. Also using a Cloud Distribution Point in AWS as well for remote users. This supports ~1200 Macs across the US and a few international.